Norwegian Leftovers

Since I’m lacking any new recent photos to share, I dug into the “vault” and found a few unreleased photos from my 2009 trip to Norway to share. The first two are new drum scans from my stack of 4×5 film.

Otertind, Norway, reflection

Otertind Reflection : Prints Available

Otertind reflects in a calm river.

Above is the beautiful mountain of Otertind, in northern Norway, reflected in a calm river on a gorgeous blue sky morning. Otertind’s striking profile is actually more attractive from a more distant perspective.

Hermannsdalstinden, summit, Lofoten Islands, Moskenesøya, Norway

Hermannsdalstinden Summit : Prints Available

A rugged view over the Lofoten Islands, as seen from the summit of Hermannsdalstinden (1029m), the tallest mountain on Moskenesøya Island.

The scrambly climb up Hermannsdalstinden in the Lofoten Islands was one of the most challenging and fun hikes I did during my six weeks in Norway, and the view from the top remains one of the most rugged mountain vistas I’ve witnessed to date. This view here is only one slice of the incredible 360º panorama encompassing granite peaks, deep fjords, alpine lakes, and of course the endless ocean beyond.

Moskenesøya, Lofoten, Kjerkfjorden, Norway, Vindstad

Vindstad Peaks : Prints Available

This 732m peak on Moskenesøya Island looks like a Norwegian version of Half Dome in Yosemite.  Kjerkfjorden and the little settlement of Vindstad are below the clouds. 

Just phenomenal scenery over there in Norway! I hope to return someday.

4 thoughts on “Norwegian Leftovers

  1. Justin

    I’d thought for sure you’d have some boarding shots for us! Looks like you and the San Juans are getting some good snow. Get out there!

    Reply
    1. Jack Brauer Post author

      Thanks Dave! The hike up Hermannsdalstinden turns into a pretty challenging steep scramble at the top. Very fun, though! Basically just monkeying over huge block boulders with a nice dose of exposure, if I remember correctly. The great thing though is that when I hiked it in late July, I got up to the top in the “afternoon” at probably around 9 or 10pm, just before sunset, it never really got dark – just dusk light – then by the time I got back down to my tent again the sun had already rose again. So cool.

      Reply

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